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Archive for the ‘Medical News’ Category

URGENT: 3 Dog & Cat Food Brands Recalled for Salmonella

Friday, February 7th, 2014

Pro-Pet LLC Recalls a Limited Number of Dry Dog and Cat Foods Due to Possible Salmonella Contamination – No illnesses have been reported, this is a precautionary alert!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – February 5, 2014 – Pro-Pet LLC, St. Marys, Ohio, has initiated a voluntary recall of a limited number of Dry Dog and Cat Foods for possible Salmonella contamination. A single field test indicated products manufactured during a two day period, on a single production line may have the potential for Salmonella contamination. Pro-Pet LLC is voluntarily recalling the potentially impacted products made during this timeframe. There have been no reports of illness related to this product to date.

Salmonella can affect animals eating the products and there is risk to humans from handling contaminated pet products, especially if they have not thoroughly washed their hands after having contact with the products or any surfaces exposed to these products.

Healthy people infected with Salmonella should monitor themselves for some or all of the following symptoms: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Rarely, Salmonella can result in more serious ailments, including arterial infections, endocarditis, arthritis, muscle pain, eye irritation, and urinary tract symptoms. Consumers exhibiting these signs after having contact with this product should contact their healthcare providers.

Pets with Salmonella infections may be lethargic and have diarrhea or bloody diarrhea, fever, and vomiting. Some pets will have only decreased appetite, fever and abdominal pain. Infected but otherwise healthy pets can be carriers and infect other animals or humans. If your pet has consumed the recalled product and has these symptoms, please contact your veterinarian.

 

Product Best By Lot Code UPC Number
40 lb Hubbard Life Happy Hound Dog Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 2A 1219033878
40 lb Hubbard Life Happy Hound Dog Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 1219033878
18 lb Hubbard Life Cat Stars Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 1219033873
40 lb Hubbard Life Maintenance Dog Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 2A 1219033875
15 lb Joy Combo Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 7065407721
40 lb Joy Combo Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 1A 7065407713
40 lb Joy Combo Cat Food 05 06 14 096 13 SM L2 2A 7065407713
20 lb QC Plus Adult Dog Food 05 07 14 097 13 SM L2 2A 2351780103
40 lb QC Plus Adult Dog Food 05 07 14 097 13 SM L2 2A 2351780104
40 lb QC Plus Adult Dog Food 05 07 14 097 13 SM L2 1A 2351780104

 

These products were distributed through select retailers, distributors and on-line consumer purchases in Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, Washington, Wisconsin and West Virginia

No other products/lot numbers are affected by this recall.

Customers should immediately discontinue use of any impacted product and contact Pro-Pet at 1-888-765-4190 for disposition.

For more information on the recall, customers can contact the customer service line for Pro-Pet at 1-888-765-4190. Customer service representatives will be available Monday through Friday 8 am to 5 pm CT.

For more information and recalled product photos, check FDA website.

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Jerky Treat Mystery: Nearly 600 Pets Dead; Still No Source, FDA Says

Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013
courtesy the Mawaka family

Photo courtesy: the Mawaka Family.   Toby, a 6-year-old Boston terrier, died in 2012 after his owners say he was sickened by chicken jerky pet treats made in China.

Nearly 600 pets have died and more than 3,600 have been sickened in an ongoing, mysterious outbreak of illnesses tied to jerky treats made in China, federal animal health officials said Tuesday.

Most of the cases have been in dogs of all breeds, ages and sizes — although 10 cats have been sickened, too — after eating chicken, duck and sweet potato jerky treats. The pace of the reported illnesses appears to have slowed, but federal Food and Drug Administration officials are now seeking extra help from veterinarians and pet owners in solving the ongoing puzzle.

“To date, testing for contaminants in jerky treats has not revealed a cause for the illnesses,” Martine Hartogensis, a deputy director for the FDA’s Center for Veterinary Medicine, said in the new report. “Despite these warnings, we have continued to receive reports of illnesses in both cats and dogs.”

The new numbers are up from some 500 deaths and 3,200 illnesses tallied in January, but the rate of reports has fallen sharply since then, mostly because two of the largest sellers of pet jerky treats announced recalls tied to the presence of unapproved antibiotic residue detected in the products.

FDA officials don’t think that antibiotic residue is the big problem that has stumped the agency since 2007, when pet owners started reporting their animals were suffering gastrointestinal and kidney problems after eating the popular jerky treats.

Instead, it’s likely that the recall of Nestle Purina PetCare Co.’s Waggin Train and Canyon Creek Ranch treats, plus Del Monte Corp.’s Milo’s Kitchen Chicken Jerky and Chicken Grillers home-style dog treats simply resulted in fewer treats being available. Three other smaller retailers also recalled the treats because of the problem.

In fact, FDA officials remain as uncertain as ever about the source of the problem that has led to reports of illnesses and warnings about the possibility of Fanconi syndrome and other kidney problems in animals that ate jerky treats.

“We still are extensively testing treats for a number of things,” Hartogensis told NBC News. “We do seem to be getting some leads, but we still have a little bit of a ways to go.”

Kendal Harr, a veterinary clinical pathologist who has been tracking the problem, says that the specific compound responsible for the illnesses continues to elude experts.

“I think that what it tells us is that the intoxicant is something that we’re not used to dealing with as a toxin in North America,” she said.

Now, in an open letter to US veterinarians, FDA officials are asking the vets to track and send detailed information about any animals sickened by jerky treats, including results of blood and urine tests. In addition, the agency is asking vets to send urine samples from suspect pets for analysis.

“This testing will allow FDA to get a better idea of how many of the suspected cases involve Fanconi syndrome, whether or not the pets display symptoms of kidney or urinary disease,” the report said.

About 60 percent of reports cite gastrointestinal illness in the animals, and about 30 percent flag kidney or urinary troubles, the report said. About 135 cases of Fanconi syndrome, a specific kind of kidney disease, have been reported.

At the same time that they’re seeking help from vets, FDA officials are putting out a fact sheet for owners that can be posted at veterinary hospitals, pet supply stores and other sites.

The agency has repeatedly cautioned that the treats are not necessary for a balanced diet, but the warnings stop short of a recall, Hartogensis said. The agency is still validating tests to detect the same kind of antibiotic residue that New York officials found earlier this year.

“If we do find an adulterated product, we will recall them,” Hartogensis said. “In terms of doing a blanket recall, at this point we don’t have enough evidence to do a blanket recall within the authority that we have.”

Because there’s no formal recall, it’s not possible to list affected brands, although a previous FDA analysis indicated that three of the top-selling brands of jerky treats sold in the U.S. were mentioned in connection with pet illnesses.

That doesn’t sit well with pet owners like Robin Pierre of Pine Bush, N.Y., who contends that Waggin’ Train chicken jerky treats were responsible for the sudden death in 2011 of her previously healthy 2-year-old pug, Bella, who developed kidney failure. She has long called for FDA to crack down on treat makers — and manufacturers.

“I am disgusted that our government continues to protect corporate American and China,” she told NBC News. “They need to start protecting the American consumer so that this does not happen again. As soon as a product is in doubt, a warning label should be placed at the point of sale so that consumers can make an educated choice.”

If a pet does become ill after eating the treats, FDA is asking owners to provide detailed information — up to and including results of a necropsy to test an animal’s tissues after death.

In the meantime, officials are trying to reach pet owners who might still have treats on hand to make sure they know about the potential problems.

“Right now, the focus for us is to make the public aware that these cases are still coming in,” she said.

Pet owners can report problems with jerky treats at the FDA’s consumer safety portal.

Read more information on: NBC News

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Have you heard your pet’s illness can be predicted?

Wednesday, November 9th, 2011
Simon the pure-bred Yellow Labrador Retriever

Image via Wikipedia

 

Although it is something I’d not specifically heard before, I am not surprised at this statement.  It comes to us from VPI – Veterinary Pet Insurance who have been keeping statistics on our pets for many years.

They track which animals are prone to what types of injuries, illnesses and conditions and based on the type of breed, age and sex, can predict what illnesses your pet will be prone to.

To sum things up, pure bred dogs (and cats) have many more problems than mixed breeds.  For example:

“A Golden Retriever is prone to hip dysplasia. It is more common in a Golden Retriever than a Labrador. German shepherds are even more prone than Golden Retrievers.”

Although insurance companies are skilled at predicting veterinary costs, they can’t factor into their numbers what a pet owner can do.

Example, preventing pet injury by securing your pets when you drive with them is an easy thing you can do to help keep them safe (and when you are driving – a pet on the loose can be a driving hazard to you too).

Pet owners who stay alert to changes in their pet’s behavior, appearance and who take care in what they feed can keep vet bills down by preventing or lessening health problems.

Also doing a little breed research on health problems that are typical for that breed will let you know what to be alert for if you choose one of these as a new pet.

Below is a chart from VPI on the most common pet medical conditions owners are making insurance claims for.

Top 10 pet medical conditions

Dogs Cats Exotics
1.   Ear Infection 1.    Lower Urinary Tract Disease 1.    Bowel obstruction
2.   Skin Allergy 2.    Gastritis/Vomiting 2.    Gastritis/Vomiting
3.   Skin Infection/Hot Spots 3.    Chronic Renal Failure 3.    Bladder Infection
4.   Gastritis/Vomiting 4.    Hyperthyroidism 4.    Upper Respiratory Infection
5.   Enteritis/Diarrhea 5.    Diabetes 5.    Eye Infection
6.   Arthritis 6.    Enteritis/Diarrhea 6.    Cancerous Tumor Requiring Surgery
7.   Bladder Infection 7.    Skin Allergy 7.    Arthritis
8.   Soft Tissue Trauma 8.    Periodontitis/Dental Disease 8.    Skin Inflammation
9.   Non-cancerous Tumor 9.    Ear Infection 9.    Skin Abscess or Pressure Ulcer
10.  Hypothyroidism 10.   Upper Respiratory Infection 10.    Inflammation of Hair Follicles
Source: Veterinary Pet Insurance Co., 2010 data

Do you have pet health questions you want answers for?  Contact one of the vets in our directory or post your question in Ask A Pet Pro.

 

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The number one reason pets are poisoned? Human medication

Saturday, March 12th, 2011

We all know the need to keep medication out of the reach of children.  Now there’s a report out that the number one call to pet poison hot lines is pets ingesting human medications.

And its the third year in  row that this has been the case.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5h7qvQmAOeAXQCzoGozJimcpGoSTQ?docId=a3521adec7234233b3a314dd7ff50cc3

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Major study of cancer in Golden Retrievers announced.

Tuesday, January 18th, 2011

Possibly the largest and longest observational study of canine cancer in dogs, specifically Golden Retrievers, is set to launch later this year.  The project is known as the Canine Lifetime Health Project, will be conducted by the Morris Animal Foundation, will follow Golden Retrievers from 2 through 7 years of age, and will span 13 years.  The purpose of this study is to better understand the genetic, nutritional and environmental risk factors for cancer and other diseases.

To read more about this study, click here: http://goo.gl/pvlZP

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