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Pet’s & Technology…it’s over the top! [humor]

Wednesday, August 15th, 2012

Yesterday while perusing news alerts for pets and vets, I came across a press release about a company that has just launched a new product. Headphones for cats. And these headphones for cats are soooo good, they will set you back $1000.

A thousand dollars!!!

If you are the teeniest bit interested, here’s a sales infomercial you have to see..

“We had to change the housing to accommodate the unique shape of cat ears and to reduce output for sensitivity,” inventor Combs says. “They also have a mic and remote, but I don’t envision many cats using that functionality.”

(And remember, they only have 10 sets so get yours today!)

Technology for pets, like technology for humans seems to be accelerating faster than dog years.

Who would have dreamed 5 years ago that stem cell treatment for pets would become a common occurrence with a high success in reversing limb and joint ailments in dogs and horses?

Medical technology I can understand. Headphones for cats…well, OK. I don’t really see a need but if you want to spend the money on your cat, OK.

Text From Dog

However, this next one is over the top. It’s about a texting dog and he has a new book coming out called “Text From Dog”

Now that’s ridiculous. A dog who texts? I have problems texting and a DOG is so good they are making a book out of his texts?????

Here’s a description and some sample text images (and, by the way these are fictitious text messages – I’m relieved to say – that are very funny. I’ve included a few below)

Tumblr blog Text From Dog, which publishes fictitious SMS conversations between a dog and its owner, is the latest web entity to land a book deal.

U.K. publisher Headline Publishing announced Monday it would release the book Oct. 25.

The blog launched in April with a brief description: “My dog sends me texts. I post them here. Yeah, it’s weird.”

 

 

Pet Grooming is good for your health (and your pet’s health too)

Friday, July 27th, 2012

 When you look at a dirty pet, what do you see?

Dirt, germs, bugs, stinkiness, things that can make you sick.

Feeling queasy?  Me too.

While your pets do not normally affect your health in a bad way (unless, of course you have a pet allergy), there is a chance that a dirty pet can introduce something unpleasant into your household that you’d rather not meet.

So having a cleaned up pet, aka pet grooming, is good for your health.  See how that is?

And it is also good for your pet’s health too!

Here is a recent article by Dr. Dave Altman of  Animal Hospital of Onslow County in Florida:

“Pet owners who view grooming merely as a way of making their animals look and smell nice may not understand the veterinary necessity of such procedures. “Pet grooming is more than just a vanity measure — it’s an essential part of preventative care,” says Dr. Altman. “Grooming at a veterinary facility can prove invaluable for early detection and prevention of many health problems.”

A typical grooming session at the animal clinic may include bathing, trimming of hair and nails, dental cleanings and anal gland expression, accompanied by a careful evaluation of the pet’s skin, eyes and ears. “Bathing and hair care procedures allow us to learn a lot about the current state of a pet’s health,” explains the vet. “We examine the skin for any signs of trouble such as hot spots, lumps or obvious infections. We can also determine whether the pet suffers from flea, tick or mite infestations.” The vet adds that any such problems can be promptly treated with hypo-allergenic medicated shampoos or other products. “The mere act of bathing can do wonders for the skin by removing pests and cleansing the skin surfaces of oils that serve as bacteria.”

Nail trimming also plays an important role in pet care, according to Dr. Altman. “Most pet owners trim their animals’ nails to preserve furniture and flooring, but this kind of grooming can also preserve a pet’s health,” he says. “Indoor pets in particular do not wear their nails down the way a wild animal would. So the nails get longer and longer until they eventually catch on something and tear away from the paw. This is not only painful, but it also gives bacteria a chance to enter, especially if the pet licks the wound.” Regular nail trimming, the doctor explains, can help prevent this type of injury. “You can trim your pet’s nails yourself, but a veterinarian or professional groomer can do the job more efficiently — and without accidentally causing harm.” The veterinarian adds that anal gland expression is another task many pet owners prefer to leave to the pet grooming professional.

Some Jacksonville pet owners might not associate dental cleanings with grooming, but Dr. Altman notes that the inside of your pet’s mouth benefits from cleanliness just as his skin and fur do. “Proper dental care helps prevent tooth decay and dangerous gum infections. All of these procedures work together to keep your pet healthier and more comfortable,” says Dr. Altman.”

Grooming your dog or cat at home (between trips to the veterinary groomer) is a good way to do your own observations of how your pet is doing, and also to increase the bond you share with them.

Many pets see getting brushed as an petting, other form source of petting.  It feels GOOD!

As you brush, pay attention to any tender areas, bumps, cuts or other things about their skin or body that might be concerning.  Of course, keep an eye open for fleas and ticks, and get those critters removed right away when you spot time.

Brush or comb the whole body, including the ears, collar area and belly.  If you can, brush daily.  If not once a week or more is good.

Check ears and wipe clean if they are dirty.

Check teeth.  Some people brush their pet’s teeth and you can find lots of products at any large pet store as well as purchasing them from your veterinarian or groomer so that you can do this at home between professional teeth cleaning visits.

Your veterinarian or groomer will also have tips for grooming your particular pets that with help you between visits.

As you do these cleaning and bonding activities, keep a notepad nearby to remind you of any questions you want to ask next time you take your pet in for a check- up.  And it goes without saying, if you find something that concerns you, get your pet in to see the vet right away.

Looks good, smells good, stays healthier and loves you even more….what’s not to like about grooming????

Plus, pet grooming is good for YOUR health too!!

To find a local or specialty veterinarian who offers grooming services, just check our directory at http://www.vetlocator.com

Petiquette & pet safety tips for the 4th of July

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Today is going to be a great evening of bar-b-ques, fireworks and get-togethers.

We hope you and your friends and family have a wonderful time, but want to remind you to make sure your pets are safely tucked away before all the noise begins. 

In the event that you and your pets are able to accept holiday invites together too we thought we’d share some petiquette tips you might find handy.

1.  The very first thing you’ll want to do is to make sure it’s ok with your host that you bring your pet with you.
2.  Next make sure he/she has a collar with an ID and that the ID has correct information on it.  These days it’s an excellent idea to use a cell number rather than a home phone number since your cell phone is usually with you and you can be reached quickly in an emergency.
3.  Put your vet’s phone number and an emergency vet hospital number into your cell phone to have it handy in the event you need it.
4.  Try to find out who’ll be at the party in case you need to make plan changes (for example people with babies, small kids or other pets can change things, including whether you should bring your pet with you).
5.  Bring along pet essentials like food and water bowls, a leash, handy wipes and cleaning stuff and pet waste bags.
6.  I like to bring some special treats with me.  Folks like to feed my dog, so I give them some of his healthy treats to make sure he’s not getting junk.
7.  Pets can make a mess sometimes so I keep a couple of baggies handy for the expected and unexpected messes and also have a lint roller in my pet kit because my dog has been known to shed.
8.  It’s not a bad idea to have a crate handy so your pet can be safely secure if things get crazy.
9.  If you notice your pet becoming tired or agitated, secure him in a closed room or his crate if you aren’t able to take him home.
10.  Don’t let pets wander around cooking food. Not only can it be a problem for the cook, but your pet might accidentally eat something that’s not good for him.
11.  Always be aware of where your pet is during any event.  Pets can become nervous and bolt in unfamiliar surroundings.  Also, like children, there are times when they’ve had enough and it’s time to go home.

Now for some personal peeves I’ve experienced attending events where certain pets should not be.  I’m titling this short list ****If your dog has any of the following problems, please leave him/her at home.

1.  Incessantly barks at other people, dogs, birds, cats, etc.  A barking dog that won’t quiet is distracting and the owners that won’t remove the dog are just plain rude.
2.  An aggressive animal.  If you know your dog – or cat – is aggressive, LEAVE THEM AT HOME.  Period.
3.  Your pet is ill or has not been feeling well.  Besides the obvious point of an ill pet might be a contagious pet, outings can be stressful and can make your pet’s health worse.  Leave an ill pet at home with a sitter and not in a kennel.
4.  The event will have people who are fearful or allergic to pets – See #1 above.
5.  Your pet is having a bad day – everyone does and our pets are no exception.  If you see that your pet is having a bad day, give him/her a break and let them stay home.

If you decide to leave your pet at home while you attend a party or other event, consider the best options for him while you’re gone.

  • If he’s not used to being home alone, you should leave for short periods of time to prepare him/her to being by themselves.
  • If you’ll be gone for any length of time you may want to consider keeping your pet at a kennel.  This is a good option for social animals that don’t stress about being away from home.
  • Additionally, for animals that are going to a kennel and may not be used to small spaces, consider getting a crate ahead of time to prepare the pet.
  • Arrange play dates for pets who might not be used to having other animals around. Send along an item that smells like home for a pet’s stay at the kennel.
  • Kennel spots should be reserved early for the holidays. If you’ve not used a particular kennel before, check into their safety measures, such as video surveillance, fire alarms and sprinkler systems.
  • Make sure your pets are up-to-date on their vaccines, and find out if any others are required for their kennel stay as most kennels will request proof before allowing your pet to stay.

Pet sitters are a good option for animals that do better at home or if you have several pets that you’ll be leaving.  If you decide to hire a pet sitter, here are a few tips:

  • Ask for references, find out what services the sitter provides and do your standard due diligence before hiring.
  • Prepare an emergency card with all of the information the sitter might need including Vet, Emergency Vet, your contact info and a close neighbors contact info, medications your pet needs along with their dosages.
  • Don’t wait till the last minute to introduce your pet to the sitter. Pet sitters should meet the pet ahead of time and be introduced to see if there are any personality issues between pet and sitter.
  • Then, while you are away, make sure to check in with the sitter during a time you know he/she will be there and let your pet hear your voice.

And with all this advice, here is one more for you.

Have a wonderful holiday and a great week that is shared with family, pets and great friends!

Linda

VetLocator.com

Secrets to Finding the Best Pet Sitter

Wednesday, June 27th, 2012

by PetsitUSA Pet Sitter Directory

What is pet sitting?

Many times a pet owner might have to travel due to business or for other reasons and during such a time it is not always possible to take your pet with you.  Even if you are able to take your pet along, you may not want to as your pet is going to be uncomfortable in an unfamiliar place.  Pets, especially dogs, prefer to have a familiar environment where they can be happier and safe.  When you change the place of residence for your pets, you can be sure they will not like it as much.  This is why it is best to leave your pet to a pet sitter.  While there are other options for you regarding leaving your pet, it is always better to leave your pet in the care of a pet sitter.

Here are some of the advantages of hiring a pet sitter:

1. With a pet sitter, your pet is not stressed because it is cared for in its comfortable surroundings.  Since there are no changes in the daily routine of your pet, you can be sure that your pet is happy.

2. There is a distinct disadvantage of leaving your pet in a pet boarding house or kennel.  For example, when it comes to dogs, if you leave your dog in a kennel, it may not get along with dogs of different breeds or other bigger or smaller dogs.  This could surely be the cause of fights or injuries.  However, a pet sitter is going to come to your house and look after your pet, which means no worries for you.

3. Another disadvantage of leaving your pet with a common pet boarding house is that you will be exposing your pet to potential infections or diseases, which are going to be affecting its health.

With a pet sitter, you do not have to worry about this.

When you think about all of this, you will find pet sitting to be your best option for your pet.

Avoid these Food to keep your Cat’s Urinary Tract Healthy

Tuesday, June 26th, 2012

by nifwlseirff

What is the right kind of cat food for urinary problems? This is something every cat owner should know. By giving your cat the right kind of food, you can make sure it stays healthy for a long time. This is true, especially in the case of urinary infections. Let me tell you what you need to do as a cat owner to help your cat stay away from urinary problems.

First of all, you need to understand the way a cat’s body works. As you know, cats usually feed on mice. What many people do not know is that nearly 3/4th of a mouse’s bodies are nothing but water. So, cats, by nature, are designed to eat food that contains high-water content. It is nature’s way to keeping them hydrated adequately. This is the reason why you do not see cats that live in the wild get urinary tract infections or other such as problems. In other words, food with high-water content is the best cat food for urinary problems.

Now, think about the kind of food that most cat owners feed their cats – commercial processed pet food, which is full of artificial chemicals, coloring agents, preservatives, and other such as things, which are not needed for the cat’s body at all. Most importantly, most of these commercial pet foods are dry. So, by making your cat eat this kind of food every day, you are literally making it vulnerable for urinary problems Now, let us come back to the question – what is the right kind of cat food for urinary problems? Let me tell you.

Start by limiting the amount of processed food your cat eats. Switch to unprocessed, raw food which is ideal for your cat’s health. Unlike processed food, fresh food does not alter the pH of cat’s urine, and hence it is safe for cats. This is why it is considered the best cat food for urinary problems. Furthermore, give your cat lots of high quality canned food with high-water content. Above all, make sure your cat drinks plenty of clean water. Since tap water is badly contaminated with a variety of bacteria, viruses, heavy metals, and poisonous chemicals, it could be harmful to your cat’s health. So, make sure you give your cat plenty of clean, filtered water to drink.

Apart from giving the right food, you can give your cat some natural health supplements, which will strengthen its urinary system and prevent urinary problems. From my experience, I can safely say that homeopathic medications are the best choice. They are effective, safe, and cheap as well they can treat infections very effectively and prevent recurring infections as well. So, a regular dose of these healthy, natural supplements will make your cat a lot stronger for sure.

I hope the article answered the question ‘what is the right kind of cat food for urinary problems.’ It is very simple – give your cat plenty of raw food to eat, clean water to drink, and a regular dose of natural health supplements. This will make sure your fluffy cat stays disease-free for a long time.

Dogs of Summer

Friday, June 22nd, 2012

Daily Paws for Ashburn Virginia

Unique Gifts for Pet-Loving Mom – Happy Mothers day!

Friday, May 11th, 2012

Mother’s Day is this weekend, and while it’s no secret that mothers take care of everything and everybody, in pet-owning homes that additionally signifies looking after a couple of additional “children.”

In reality, pets are considered part of the family according on to a National Pet Owners Survey executed by the American Pet Products Association. So that makes buying for the most wonderful gift for mother a little easier – especially if it seems like she has everything. For the pet-loving mom, distinctive gift ideas abound when you consider animal-themed gifts.

So here are a few fun possibilities to shower upon the “pet mom” in your life this year:

Framed Dog Art by art4cheap are an original way to celebrate the pet in your mom’s life. These unique portraits (picture on right) perfectly express pets’ personalities and add life and beauty to any home.

The FURminator Dog Brush gives mom a much-needed hand cleaning the house after furry family members. With a stainless steel de-shedding edge, the FURminator greatly reduces shedding — up to 90%! — and keeps dogs happy. Available in small, medium, and large.

Not your average dog tag! Whether her dog or cat is a Mama’s Boy or they’re BFFs, mom won’t be able to resist the unique customizable tags for pets.  DogTagArt offers hundreds of full color tags that capture pets’ personalities and help ensure they find their way home if they become lost. Create custom dog tags with your own photos or artwork. Surprise mom with a tag for her favorite pet!

Minty fresh breath sure beats “doggie” and “kitten” breath and now Chambers makes unique strong mints for humans. These treats come in 3 assorted beautiful dog tins great for collecting as well. These delicious mints are great for the stylish pet-obsessed mother in your life!

Diamonds may be a girl’s best friend, but the purr-fect Mother’s Day gift for the cat-loving mom just might be a pair of earrings, bracelet or a necklace capturing the fun and elegance of felines. Choose from silver to multicolored jewelry that suits the taste of every feline mom.

Eye and Dream Pillows for mom are both incredibly cute and practical. These unique relaxation products, by Warm Whiskers, can be chilled to soothe tired eyes and reduce eye puffiness. They may also be warmed to relieve sinus pressure or used as a dream pillow to ease you into a deep sleep. The Eye and Dream Pillows are filled with flax seed, chamomile and lavender, products all well known for their amazing relaxation qualities. Available in adorable dog, cat, bunny, polar bear, and brown bear designs.

The Paw Plunger Dog Paw Cleaner helps mom keep both her house and her car as neat as a pin. The Paw Plunger features soft, cleaning bristles to keep mud off your pooch’s paws. Simply add warm water, dunk paws one-at-a-time, dry with a towel, and presto! No more muddy tracks.

Gift certificates are also a great way to treat pet moms. And as a bonus, many online retailers even offer e-mail gift certificates if mom is far away this year.

 

Happy Mothers day!

Dog adopts rescued piglet

Wednesday, May 9th, 2012

A piglet fell out of a livestock truck in Kansas and was found on the road by a family who fortunately happens to run a vet hospital. They decided to take the pig in and take care of the baby animal, naming her Mu Shu.

When the family dog, Hunter, met the piglet he started to look after Mu Shu, and an odd friendship was formed. Hunter helps lead the partially-blind pig around, plays with her and keeps her clean. The pair are completely inseparable now, so the family has decided to adopt Mu Shu permanently.

 

Read more: http://www.lifewithdogs.tv/2012/04/dog-nurses-rescued-piglet-back-to-health/

Emergency Kit For Your Pet: What would you add to the list?

Tuesday, April 17th, 2012

Recent natural disasters happening around the world highlight the need to have emergency procedures in place for our own families.

Disaster emergencies can require being prepared to evacuate our homes from a short absence to a permanent relocation.

It’s disorienting enough for people to have to evacuate, however when pets have to leave, it is very disrupting.

Today, I came across an ASPCA article which lists helpful pet preparedness information. Below are some ideas from the ASPCA for an emergency kit to keep on hand for your pet. Remember, food and medications need to be rotated out of your emergency kit every two months—otherwise they may spoil or become useless.

  • A traveling bag, crate or sturdy carrier, ideally one for each pet (Pet Grab-n-Go Crate)
  • Pet first-aid kit and guide book
  • 3-7 days’ worth of canned (pop-top) or dry food
  • Bottled water, at least 7 days’ worth for each person and pet
  • Disposable litter trays (aluminum roasting pans are perfect)
  • Litter or paper toweling
  • Liquid dish soap and disinfectant
  • Disposable garbage bags for clean-up
  • Pet feeding dishes
  • Extra harness and leash (harnesses are recommended for safety and security)
  • Photocopies of medical records and a waterproof container with a two-week supply of any medicine your pet requires
  • Flashlight
  • Blanket (for scooping up a fearful pet)
  • Recent photos of your pets (in case you are separated and need to make “Lost” posters)
  • Your pet’s favorite toy

 

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Pet CPR – When To Use It To Save Your Pet’s Life

Friday, March 30th, 2012

Pet CPR & First Aid Taken from Rescue Critters, www.rescuecritters.com, makers of animal training mannequins.

The following is a simple breakdown of dog & cat CPR. It’s written for the average pet owner and in plain language. It uses the common accepted approach to pet cardiopulmonary resuscitation according to excepted standards of Pet First Aid courses throughout the United States. Pet First Aid is not intended to take the place of professional veterinary care. It is recommended that you take a Pet First Aid course from a certified instructor.

ABC’s (Airway, Breathing, Circulation)

Airway: Probably one of the most important things you can do after SAFETY is to make sure your dog or cat is breathing. To do this, you want to gently tap your dog or cat and call out their name to see if they move. Then (being careful not to get bitten or scratched) lean down close and LOOK, LISTEN AND FEEL for breathing.

  • Look: at the chest of the animal to see if it’s moving.
  • Listen: to see if you can hear them breathing.
  • Feel: on your cheek or back of your hand for a breath.

Breathing: If your dog or cat is not breathing, pull their tongue just a little bit, close the mouth and tilt their head just a little to open their Airway. Give them 4 -5 breaths from your (guess what?) mouth to their nose! This is Mouth-to-Snout resuscitation. You’ll want to give them just enough air to make the chest rise. Big dogs need more – little dogs or cats much less. Remember not to give too much air! You don’t want to hurt them.

Circulation: This means you’re checking to see if their heart is working OK. To do that you must check for a heart beat which is called a pulse. There are pulse points located in various areas on your dog or cat. For a dog the best place to find the pulse is on the inside of the rear leg, towards the top of the leg. This is called the Femoral Pulse. For a cat the best place to find the pulse is on the outside of the left front leg, just behind the shoulder. This is called an Apical Pulse.

Rescue Breathing

Rescue Breathing is when you have to breath for your dog or cat because they are not breathing on their own. You do this when your dog or cat has a pulse but is not breathing.

  • Step 1: First do your ABC’s, don’t forget to LOOK, LISTEN, and FEEL for breathing.
  • Step 2: If not breathing, give 4-5 breaths using Mouth-to-Snout resuscitation.
  • Step 3: Check for pulse on the Femoral Artery for dogs or check the Apical Pulse for cats or really small dogs.
  • Step 4: If there is a pulse, but no breathing start Mouth-to-Snout resuscitation giving 1 breath every 3 seconds. For cats or really small dogs, give 1 breath every 2 seconds.

CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation)

CPR: First do your ABC’s, don’t forget to LOOK, LISTEN, and FEEL for breathing. CPR can only be performed if your dog or cat is not breathing and has no pulse. Follow Steps 1,2,3 same as in Rescue Breathing. If there is no Pulse, start CPR

Dog = Place the dog on the ground or other hard surface with its right side down. Take it’s left front leg and bend at the elbow, rotating at the shoulder. The point where the elbow of the dog touches the body is where you place your hands for compressions. Put one hand on top of the other and clasp your fingers together. Lock your elbows and start performing compressions. Push approximately 2-3 inches deep. Give compressions first then a breath. After 1 minute check for a pulse. repeat if there’s no response.

  • Giant Dogs = Give 1 breath every 10 compressions.
  • Medium to large dogs = Give 1 breath every 5 compressions.
  • Small Dogs = Give 1 breath every 5 compressions.

Cats or really small dogs = Place the animal flat on the ground. Then put your hands on either side of the animal’s chest, right behind the shoulder blades with your palms over the heart (sandwiching the animal’s chest between both hands). Compress approximately ½ – 1 inch deep. After 1 minute, check for a pulse again.

  • Cats or really small dogs = Give 1 breath every 3 compressions.